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THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME OF THE PHARMACEUTICAL TREATMENT OPTIONS

Speak to your healthcare provider to determine your course of action



Over-the-counter sleep aids can be effective for short-term or occasional insomnia. Examples of over-the-counter sleep aids include first-generation antihistamines or allergy medications that have a sedating effect. Others include herbal/dietary/hormone supplements like melatonin. All sleep aids have the risk for side effects so talk to your healthcare provider to learn more about treatment options.

Pharmaceutical treatment options include drug classes like:

  • Benzodiazepines:
    • Benzodiazepines works to enhance the brain’s response to the sleep neurotransmitter, GABA, that is naturally found in your brain.
  • Non-Benzodiazepines:
    • This class is also known as the “Z-drugs”. These drugs work similarly to benzodiazepines in the fact that they slow down your brain by binding to GABAA receptors.
  • Melatonin receptor agonist:
    • Drugs in this class bind to the same sites as melatonin, a naturally occurring chemical in your brain. Your natural melatonin regulates your circadian rhythm and is increased at night.
  • Orexin receptor antagonist:
    • Medications in this class work to indirectly promote sleep by blocking a chemical formed in your body called orexin, which is responsible for arousal and wakefulness.
  • Sedative antidepressants:
    • Older antidepressants are sometimes used for promoting sleep by blocking histamine and increasing serotonin and norepinephrine.


References:

- Insomnia. National Sleep Foundation.
- Insomnia. American Sleep Association.

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Speak to your doctor SPEAK TO YOUR DOCTOR IF INSOMNIA MAY INTERFERE WITH YOUR LIFE.

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